LAND USE

 

Introduction

Land is a limited resource, and as population density increases, greater care should be taken in how it is used.  The land use element is defined as a compilation of objectives, policies, goals, maps and programs to guide the future development and redevelopment of public and private property. 

 

Selected Survey Results

The following questions from the first landowner survey that were pertinent to Land Use are:

 

 

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Agree

Strongly
Agree

No Response

1.  The Town of Spring Brook should preserve as much farmland as possible.

19

58

163

141

38

2.  A landowner or farmer should have the right to sell his or her farmland for purposes other than farming.

21

28

239

102

29

3.  There should be a limit as to how many farm animals can exist on a farm.

81

135

137

39

27

4.  Productive farm land should not be converted to non-farm uses.

41

142

136

70

30

5.  There is a conflict between farm and non-farm neighbors regarding dust, noise and odors.

51

158

146

31

33

6.  Agricultural land should not be used for residential housing purposes.

43

170

118

63

25

7.  Agricultural land should not be used for commercial/industrial purposes.

43

117

124

104

31

11.  The Town of Spring Brook should regulate the minimum size of a lot for rural housing.

79

85

148

88

19

12.  Landowners should be allowed to sell their land to whomever they choose, regardless of how the land will be used.

70

108

141

74

26

13.  Business/commercial development should be allowed only in designated areas.

32

72

184

106

25

14.  Agri-business development should be allowed only in designated areas.

37

108

182

65

27

15.  I am satisfied with the way things are happening in the Town of Spring Brook regarding land use and growth.

26

16

290

49

38

16.  Land use/regulations, governing development in the Town of Spring Brook should be more restrictive.

76

126

141

42

34

17.  Land use policies and regulations should be relaxed so that development can respond more freely to market conditions.

61

195

87

34

42

18.  Land use policies and regulations should emphasize preserving the rural and agricultural character of the Town of Spring Brook.

28

50

185

112

44

21. Trees and “open” spaces are more important to me than neighboring houses.

17

38

179

148

37

22. It is important to preserve woodlands and environmentally sensitive areas in the Town of Spring Brook.

18

29

182

151

39

23. Gravel pit(s) should be allowed to operate in the Town of Spring Brook.

45

66

232

42

34

24. Unlicensed salvage or junkyards should be allowed to operate in the Town of Spring Brook.

169

149

40

27

34

25. More parks, recreational areas and green spaces are needed in the Town of Spring Brook.

56

161

128

40

34

32. What should be the minimum lot size for single family homes in the Town of Spring Brook?

1 acre

3 acre

5 acre

10 acre

35 acre

open

109

73

104

31

13

60

Other, please state:

35. Do you anticipate subdividing or selling your land in the Town of Spring Brook for

development within the next 5 years?

Yes

No

No response

21

356

42

37. Currently the Town of Spring Brook does not have a comprehensive plan which sets out community goals and strategies to guide growth and development.  Such a comprehensive plan is advisory and does not have enforcement powers.  Do you think the town should develop such a plan?        241 Yes           154 No              24 No response

38. Currently the Town of Spring Brook does not have land use ordinances regulating the use and development of land.  Do you think the town should enact such ordinances?

                                                                     220 Yes              178 No                21 No response

44. What roles should elected officials of the Town of Spring Brook play in land use planning? (mark all appropriate)

Educational

Advisory

Regulatory

No role

159

234

154

74

            Relevant questions from the second landowner survey are:

5. Our township is unique in that it has a large area of flat/open land ideal for raising agricultural crops. The land use map that has been developed by the agriculture subcommittee indicates 70% or more of the land in our township is currently used for agriculture. Would you like to see ordinances enacted to limit residential development of agricultural land in the Town of Spring Brook? Yes/No

Yes – 141 (64%)      No – 66 (30%)    No Response – 13 (6%)

           

7. Do you feel that:

A. As a landowner, you should have the freedom to use your property in any way and for any purpose you deem fit.

B. As a landowner, you should consider the rights of your neighbors when making decisions about use of your property.

Please circle A  or  B

A – 75 (34%)     B – 134 (61%)    No Response – 11 (5%)

           

8. In the first survey, the majority of respondents indicated a desire for minimum lot size limits of 5 acres or less. Please circle as many of the following choices that describe your interest in a lot size limit:

A.        Concern for potential groundwater contamination (Some feel dense residential development utilizing septic systems can have a negative effect on groundwater)              110 Responses out of 220

B.        Minimize land consumption/Sprawl     119 Responses out of 220

C.        I prefer no limit     41 Responses out of 220

D.        Maintain the rural character of the township     147 Responses out of 220

E.        Privacy through larger lots     96 Responses out of 220

F.         Other __(see comments  page)


Inventory

 

Land Use Summary, Source: 2004 Dunn County Real Estate Valuation Statement

General Property

No.

Imp. parcels

Total

Acres

*Town Net Density per

Parcel

Average parcel size

In acres

Residential

628

474

1,478

1:24.14

2.35

Commercial

5

5

22

1:1,621.64

4.4

Manufacturing

0

0

0

0

0

Agricultural

962

0

26,835

1:1.33

27.90

Undeveloped

590

0

2,166

1:16.47

3.67

Forest

357

0

5,049

1:7.07

14.14

Other

123

123

126

1:283.14

1.02

Total

2,665

 

35,676

 

 

* Town net density per parcel represents the average amount of land for a use compared to the total land available. Example; Under the Residential category the Town net density per parcel is 1:24.14, this means that on the average for every 24.14 acres of land in the town a residential use exists.

 

Land Supply

Total acres in the Town is 35,676

 

Land Demand

Currently, the two major uses demanding land in the Town are maintaining or expansion of agriculture and residential development.

 

Land Prices

According to an informal poll of local realtors in the autumn of 2004, the lowest price farm land was selling for around $1800 per acre, irrigated farmland up to $4000 per acre.  Residential property or property being bought for residential development   was selling for about $18,000 to $40,000 for a one acre lot.  Five to six acre residential lots were selling for about $15,000 to $30,000 per acre.

 

Redevelopment

The town is basically agricultural in nature. It is a rural environment with no incorporated areas, no blighted neighborhoods, and no abandoned commercial/industrial sites. There are no traditional redevelopment opportunities. Redevelopment in rural areas happens as farmland is converted to non-farm uses.

 

Conflicts

Land use conflicts occur as different land uses are placed or are planned to be placed next to each other. The nature of the conflict depends on the circumstances and the views of those affected by the land uses. Regardless of the type or degree of conflict, they can have significant impacts on a community’s quality of life and land values. Conflicts can also affect future land use development patterns. From discussions with elected officials and the general population, no land use conflicts have been identified.        


Maps

The following are explanation of maps found in  Appendix E.

 

Soil Productivity

      This land is necessary for the continuation of the production of food or fiber and was defined strictly by soil productivity.  It did not reflect whether the land is currently being cropped or has a history of cropping.  For planning purposes, soils are considered to be of high or medium production if they meet the following 3 criteria:

 

Floodplains

For the purpose of this plan the flooded soils have been mapped, and, as is the case with the FEMA maps, errors have been found. Therefore, it is important to note that this information is generalized for planning purposes and that these materials do not replace the need for site-specific evaluation.

 

Wetlands

For the purpose of this plan hydric soils have been mapped. It is important to note that this information is generalized for planning purposes and that these materials do not replace the need for site-specific evaluation.

 

Steep Slopes

Steep slopes are any area where the slope of the land is greater than 12%. Areas having steep slopes can be categorized into three categories 0-12%, slight, 13%-19%, moderate and 20% and greater, severe limitations. Development on slopes 0-12% should consider the effect of direct runoff to receiving waters or wetlands and may need to follow state approved construction site erosion controls. Land with slopes 13%-19% should also consider the effect of direct runoff to receiving waters or wetlands, follow state approved construction site erosion controls, and institute best management practices to control on site runoff and pollution. Land with slopes of 20% or greater represents a significant threat of severe erosion, which results in negative impacts to surface and ground waters as well as higher construction costs. Development on slopes 20% or greater should be highly discouraged or strongly regulated.

 

Woodlands

Woodlands, for the purpose of this plan, are woodlots 10 acres or greater in size which is the minimum acreage required to be enrolled in the State’s Managed Forest Program.

 

Water Quality Management

Every county in the State of Wisconsin is required to have a Land and Water Resource Management Plan which identifies its resource concerns and strategies for addressing and correcting the problems. The Town’s Comprehensive Plans will be consolidated into Dunn County’s Land and Water Resource Management Plan.  The county plan will provide an educational strategy, a voluntary program to achieve compliance with applicable state and county standards, and a regulatory approach should the first two approaches fail.

 

Existing Land Use

The primary purpose of the Existing Land Use map is to accurately inventory the Town’s present land use situation. This process utilized photo interpretation, field surveys, and local review. The end result of this inventory process was the existing land use map. The inventory results confirm that the Town is a rural community with a large agricultural base and a healthy variety of natural areas and, according to the goals and objectives, hopes to be maintained as such.

To more accurately represent current land use patterns, eleven categories were developed. These categories are not assessment or taxation classifications nor are they zoning districts. For the purpose of this plan the following definitions were used;

Industrial

Parcel of land zoned industrial or its primary use is industrial in nature.

Commercial

Parcel of land zoned commercial or its primary use is commercial in nature.

Residential

Parcel of land 10 acres or smaller with a primary use as residential, includes vacant lots.

Residential-Woods

Parcel of land greater than 10 acres, is predominantly wooded and contains a private residence.

Residential-Ag

Parcel of farmland greater than 10 acres and contains a private residence.

Farmland

Parcel of land containing a combination of cropland, CRP land, pastures, woodlands, wetlands and open water and is predominantly agricultural in nature.

Farmland-Woods

Parcel of farmland with a minimum of 10 acres as woods.

Farmstead

Parcel of farmland containing a farm residence and/or Ag-related residential unit(s).

Mixed

Parcel of land greater than 10 acres, is not residential, cropland, commercial or industrial in nature and contains woods, woodland programs, open water and wetlands (or some combination).

Public Recreation

Parcel of land owned by the county, state or federal government and open to the public for recreational use.

Public

Parcel of land owned by local, county, state or federal government or by other tax-exempt organization.

 

Preferred Land Use

The Preferred Land Use map is intended to be a graphic and pictorial depiction of the desired pattern of land use showing general location, character and intensity of land uses for the foreseeable future. The map itself is not intended to be a rigid end-product document, but a necessary planning tool to help the community to evaluate its position on development issues and thereby formulating policies which will best achieve local objectives in an effective and flexible manner. The following were used as general guidelines in delineating preferred development areas:

·        Proximity to existing development and roads.

·        Terrain which is suitable for development, considering slope, wetlands, and other physical limitations.


Future Land Use Needs

 

Projections

 

2010

2015

2020

2025

Number of Housing Units

68

72

75

79

Acres of Housing Units

156

163

172

180

Number of Commercial Units

0

0

0

0

Acres of Commercial Units

0

0

0

0

 

Boundaries of Public Service Areas

            For the purpose of this plan public utilities refer to public sewer and water service area plans. The City of Menomonie has such a plan but it affects only the Towns of Menomonie, Red Cedar and Tainter, subsequently that plan is not incorporated with this comprehensive plan.